HOT BLAST: A real War on Christmas
Dec 03, 2013 | 1337 views |  0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Idaho Capitol Christmas tree, a 50-foot Blue Spruce, was lit during a ceremony Monday in Boise, Idaho. (AP Photo/The Idaho Statesman, Kyle Green)
The Idaho Capitol Christmas tree, a 50-foot Blue Spruce, was lit during a ceremony Monday in Boise, Idaho. (AP Photo/The Idaho Statesman, Kyle Green)
slideshow
The latest issue of Pacific Standard examines What a Real War on Christmas Looks Like.

First, the setup:

If Christmas is really under attack, this is news to most Americans, who celebrate the holiday to ridiculous excess. Americans spend some $3 trillion a year on Christmas shopping and celebration. Almost 20 percent of all industry sales in the entire country come from holiday shopping. Some 12 percent of Americans start Christmas shopping in September, and many stores this year will open on Thanksgiving Day to give Christmas shoppers a head start on their buying. If there’s really a war going on, Christmas is winning.

And then here's the payoff:

In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, the Soviet Union instituted a program to rid the country of all religious behavior. Top of the list: Christmas. Communist leaders worked to actively suppress Christmas, and all other Christian celebrations, as bourgeois and superstitious. There were several anti-religious campaigns, the most dramatic of which occurred in the 1920s. ...

The state prohibited people from selling Christmas trees. There were even festivals, organized by the League of Militant Atheists, specifically to denigrate religious holidays. Their carnivals were inspired by similar events staged by activists after the French Revolution. From 1923 to 1924 and then again from 1929 to 1930 the “Komsomol Christmases” and Easters were basically holiday celebrations of atheism.



 
Comments must be made through Facebook
No personal attacks
No name-calling
No offensive language
Comments must stay on topic
No infringement of copyrighted material


Friends to Follow



Most Recommended
Today's Events

event calendar

post a new event

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Marketplace