HOT BLAST: Military posts and Civil War figures
May 28, 2013 | 2461 views |  0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jamie Malanowski writes in The New York Times: "Braxton Bragg, for whom Fort Bragg in North Carolina is named, was irascible, ineffective, argumentative with subordinates and superiors alike, and probably would have been replaced before inflicting half the damage that he caused had he and President Jefferson Davis not been close friends."
Jamie Malanowski writes in The New York Times: "Braxton Bragg, for whom Fort Bragg in North Carolina is named, was irascible, ineffective, argumentative with subordinates and superiors alike, and probably would have been replaced before inflicting half the damage that he caused had he and President Jefferson Davis not been close friends."
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Writing in The New York Times over the weekend, author Jamie Malanowski described the 10 U.S. Army bases "named after generals who led soldiers who fought and killed United States Army soldiers" as "egregious." He compares "the naming of United States Army bases after Confederate generals" to the U.S. military having a "Fort Rommel" or a "Camp Cornwallis."

UPDATE: On the flipside, Phillip Tutor wrote last year about how Anniston's military post came to be named after a Union general.

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