HOT BLAST: The roots of the IRS nonprofit office's dysfunction
May 20, 2013 | 1889 views |  0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Ousted IRS chief Steven Miller, right, testifies on Capitol Hill Friday.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Ousted IRS chief Steven Miller, right, testifies on Capitol Hill Friday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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In case you missed it: ProPublica has an explainer on the IRS/Tea Party scandal and what led to it.

It quotes a former IRS attorney - “The story people are overlooking is: Congress is complaining about underpaid, overworked employees who are not adequately trained."

It also includes this nugget of information: "In the end, after all the millions of anonymous money spent by some groups to elect candidates in 2012, after all the groups that said in their applications that they would not spend money to elect candidates before doing exactly that, after the Cincinnati office flagged conservative groups, the IRS approved almost all the new applications. Only eight applications were denied." (Emphasis ours.)

The article begins by noting:

The IRS division responsible for flagging Tea Party groups has long been an agency afterthought, beset by mismanagement, financial constraints and an unwillingness to spell out just what it expects from social welfare nonprofits, former officials and experts say. The controversy that erupted in the past week, leading to the ousting of the acting Internal Revenue Service commissioner, an investigation by the FBI, and congressional hearings that kicked off Friday, comes against a backdrop of dysfunction brewing for years.
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